Know Your Labels

Many food labels are confusing and some are downright misleading. The best way for consumers to learn how the animals connected with a particular food item are treated is to visit the farm in question. Unfortunately, this is not a realistic option for most people.

The next best approach is to choose animal-derived food products that are certified by an independent, third party as having come from animals raised on high-welfare, pasture-based farms.

Meat and other products from humanely raised animals also may be found at natural food co-ops, farmers markets and through direct sales on the Internet, but in many cases may lack third-party certification that the claims are accurate.

 

Look for this label:

Animal Welfare Approved

The one independent label that means healthy, safe, environmentally responsible and humanely raised. This program has the highest standards for animal welfare and is the only multi-species humane food certification program that requires that all animals be raised outdoors on pasture or range. AWA supports high-welfare family farmers through no-cost certification and good husbandry grants.

 

 

Other, less stringent options:

USDA Organic

Because the national organic regulations lack concrete animal welfare standards, production methods vary. Some organic farms raise animals according to high-welfare standards, while others are only marginally better than conventional industry production. Also, pasture access is required for ruminants (such as cows), but not poultry or pigs. Check out the Cornucopia Institute’s organic dairy and egg scorecards to identify the best organic farmers of various products.

 

Steps 4 and 5 only of Global Animal Partnership (GAP)

This is an animal welfare-rating scheme, not a high-welfare food certification program. Only Steps 4 and 5 require pasture access. Standards for Steps 1 through 3 are not sufficiently strong to be considered high welfare for farm animals.

 

Beware of these labels:

Natural

This label claim merely means that the product has no artificial ingredients and was minimally processed. The claim has no relevance whatsoever to how the animals were raised.

Naturally Raised

The government definition of this claim is “vegetarian-fed and raised without antibiotics and hormones.” Better than “natural,” this claim still does not specifically address animal care and does not require freedom of movement or access to fresh air and sunlight.

No Antibiotics

While there are important human health reasons to limit the subtherapeutic use of antibiotic to enhance farm animal growth and serve as a cheap compensation for unsanitary conditions, food labels that assert that no antibiotics were used can also mean that treatment was intentionally withheld from an injured or sick animal in order to market the food as “antibiotic free.”

No Hormones

This claim has some relevance in terms of animal welfare for dairy and beef products. However, hormones are already prohibited by federal regulation for use in poultry, pork and veal products.  Use of “no hormones” on the label on these latter products is therefore superfluous and does not distinguish them as more humane or healthier than any competing poultry, pork, or veal product.

USDA Process Verified

USDA conducts audits to verify that the company is following its own standards in raising animals. Hence, the meaning of a term such as "humanely raised" can vary widely among producers and all receive USDA Process Verified approval for the claim. Products from factory-farmed animals can carry the USDA PVP seal.