Please Join AWI in NYC on July 9 to Raise Awareness Concerning the Dog Meat Trade and Shark Finning

Date: 
Friday, July 5, 2013

Dear Humanitarians in New York,

Please join us on July 9 at the New York Asian Film Festival in New York City to raise awareness on the South Korean dog meat trade, the illicit dog meat trade in the Philippines, and shark finning. The film festival will take place in the FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER’S WALTER READE THEATER, located at 165 West 65th Street, between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues.

By subway: the 1 train stops at 66th Street. Columbus Circle, a major transportation hub, is also only five blocks away.

By bus: the M104, M5, and M7 buses all stop in front of Lincoln Center.

I am coordinating the event and will be there with my rescue dog from South Korea, Lucy, from 12:00 pm until 8:00 pm handing out leaflets in front of the Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater. If you can join us—even just for half an hour, please email me at Rosalyn@awionline.org.

If you are not able to join us at the event on Tuesday, you can still take action on these important issues by sending letters to officials in South Korea and the Philippines, and by submitting comments on the implementation to the proposed rule on shark finning to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Why this is important, and actions you can take:

Did you know that over 2 million dogs are reportedly killed for food every year in South Korea? The method of slaughter is usually extremely (and even intentionally) brutal, and the dogs are often butchered in full view of others. Sadly, many who support the dog meat trade believe that high adrenaline levels in dogs will produce tender meat—which results in these helpless creatures being sadistically killed by bludgeoning, slow strangulation, or even electrocution. Deaths that are preceded by panic and fear in the dogs occur on a daily basis throughout the country. At the open-air markets, dogs are electrocuted and their necks are broken—all in plain sight of passers-by.

Take action: Send a letter to officials in South Korea through the Compassion Index by clicking here. You will find suggested talking points to include in your letter once you click through to the Compassion Index.

Even though the Philippines banned the dog meat trade in 1998 for animal welfare reasons, the trade in dog meat continues largely unabated—half a million dogs are illegally slaughtered annually in the Philippines for human consumption. The implementation of the Anti-Rabies Act of 2007 substantially increased the penalties for convicted dog meat traders, as a way of protecting the Philippine public from rabies transmission, and dogs from the cruelty of a black market trade. And yet the trade continues.

Shark finning is the inhumane practice of cutting off a shark’s fins, often while the shark is still alive, and discarding the body into the ocean. The sharks die of suffocation or are attacked by predators because they have been rendered unable to swim. The commercial value of shark fins is high compared to their meat; by keeping only the fins, fishing vessels can take more sharks on a single voyage, making the hunting ruthlessly efficient. The Shark Conservation Act of 2010 (SCA) was enacted to combat finning by requiring that sharks in U.S. waters be landed with their fins naturally attached. NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has now proposed a rule to implement the SCA—but may do so in a way that undermines stricter state laws.

Take action: Click here to view AWI’s Action Alert on implementation of the proposed NMFS rule on shark finning and to make comments to NOAA by the July 8 deadline.

For more on the cruel dog meat trade and shark finning, please visit awionline.org/dogmeat and awionline.org/content/shark-finning. Also, be sure to share this “Dear Humanitarian” eAlert with family, friends and co-workers, and encourage them to join us on the 9th.

As always, thank you very much for helping animals!

Sincerely,

Rosalyn Morrison
Legislative Assistant
Government and Legal Affairs

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