Urge Congress to SAVE Right Whales

Photo from Flickr by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission NOAA

Dear Humanitarian,

Traversing the waters of the entire US East Coast, the North Atlantic right whale inhabits one of the most industrialized oceans in the world. As such, these whales, which number as few as 420, are in serious jeopardy of extinction, largely due to entanglement in fishing gear and ship strikes.

At least 28 North Atlantic right whales have died since the beginning of 2017. Collisions with vessels and entanglement in fishing gear have been identified as the cause of death for the majority of these whales. Statistics show that 85 percent of North Atlantic right whales bear entanglement scars, and females are particularly vulnerable. Only a third survive a severe entanglement incident, and those who do are less likely to have calves. As a result, the North Atlantic right whale population has dramatically declined, and only 12 calves have been born since 2017. Right whales who collide with ships will often experience serious injuries, such as blunt force trauma, propeller cuts, and broken bones, from which they might never recover.

In order to save the North Atlantic right whale, we must reduce these threats. The bipartisan SAVE Right Whales Act (H.R. 1568/S. 2453), would provide federal funding opportunities for collaborative efforts between states, nongovernmental organizations, and industry leaders to create and implement much-needed conservation efforts to protect the North Atlantic right whale.

What You Can Do

Please ask your legislators to help save the North Atlantic right whale from extinction by cosponsoring the SAVE Right Whales Act.

Be sure to share this eAlert with your family, friends, and co-workers, and encourage them to contact their representatives, too. Thank you for taking action on behalf of wildlife and companion animals!

Sincerely,

Cathy Liss
President

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Photo from Flickr by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission NOAA