AWI Quarterly » 2005 Summer

Several years ago, Ben White of AWI co-founded the cetacean freedom network, an email-based assembly of captivity-conscious individuals and groups.
A pseudo-environmental political campaign was concocted back in 1997 to "protect" nearly 60 million acres of unroaded backcountry in national forests. Launched with great fanfare and expensive publicity, President Clinton put the protection into effect during the very last days of his tenure in 2000.
Saving Amazon rainforests is the goal of many environmental groups around the world, but the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) differs from most of its fellow organizations in its motivations. "The agenda we have is driven by the Indians," said Executive Director Liliana Madrigal. ACT strives to work with indigenous people to preserve their cultures, as well as the plants and animals living in their midst.
It sounds too unbelievable to be true, but Helen and Bill Thayer actually lived alongside a pack of wolves for an entire year. With the motivation of studying the animals outside of captivity, within a natural habitat in Canada, the adventuresome couple set out on an expedition with their dog Charlie—albeit with mixed expectations.
American horses may soon be safe from slaughter, thanks to two recent landmark votes in Congress. The first prohibits the use of taxpayer dollars to fund the slaughter of wild horses, and the second goes even further by stopping the use of these funds to slaughter any horse in the United States.
In our nation's capital, there are lobbyists for every industry imaginable—agriculture, energy, tobacco, defense—but what about the animals? Who lobbies for them? Fifty years ago, it was illegal for non-profit tax-exempt organizations to engage in such activities.
The Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) is proud to be a supporting member of America's Whale Alliance (AWA). This coalition of over 80 US groups was founded by Ocean Defense International in response to the apparent change of direction of the US government regarding its opposition to the resumption of commercial whaling.
Although wolves are considered an endangered species throughout the United States, they number in the thousands in Alaska—where it remains legal to hunt them. April 30, 2005 marked the end of Alaska's most recent hunting season, but it did not come and go without a price.